Reading Review: Potential Resources to Support Visual Literacy

I started my search for resources to teach visual literacy through the UBC library online catalogue. I first searched using “visual literacy”, then added “teaching” and finally “visual literacy and digital technology”. Most of the articles were studies about the importance of visual literacy, what it is and how to teach it using art, picture books, graphic novels etc. There were some very useful articles that will be helpful to me in terms of teaching visual literacy, but they didn’t quite fit the criteria for this review so I didn’t include them in my results.

For finding specific ways to teach visual literacy using digital technology I thought I would be more successful with a Google search. I found a number of possibilities searching the phrase “teaching visual literacy”. Including keywords such as media literacy and digital technology did not seem to add to the results. There are many sites I found that I think would be useful, but the following are the ones I think most fit my inquiry in using digital technology to help me teach visual literacy.

 

  1. http://www.colormatters.com

This site talks about the importance of colour to communication.  You can take a global colour survey and see how people associate colour with emotions, power, death, etc.  You can explore the articles on the meaning of colour, colour and branding, colour psychology in medicine, colour in history, colour science etc.

 

  1. http://abud.me/digital-activities-for-visual-literacy/

This site has links to others with digital activities that help support visual literacy or teach visual literacy to students including an interactive tutorial from the Three Brain Networks, an image-based personality test called Visual DNA and a game app called 4 Pics 1 Word.  I am looking forward to checking them out in more detail to see how they support visual literacy learning.

 

  1. http://www.learnnc.org/search?phrase=visual%20literacy

From the University of North Carolina, this site contains a list of resources and lesson plans about teaching with photographs, mapping skills as visual literacy, using photos as discussion using Bloom’s Taxonomy etc. There is a lot here and I hope I will get some ideas I can use.

 

  1. https://www.marqueed.com

I found this YouTube video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VcO4kfJn3-M) on using a program called Marqueed to teach visual literacy. Design professionals are able to collaborate and discuss images using this site. With a class, the video suggests you can set up your own collection of images and have students discuss them as a visual literacy exercise. It looks interesting.

 

  1. http://www.edutopia.org/blog/ccia-10-visual-literacy-strategies-todd-finley

This blog post talks about strategies for teaching visual literacy.  One strategy is something called Five Card Flickr. Students create stories from 5 random photos with the same tag from Flickr. Searching the Edutopia site, there are a number of other posts about visual literacy that I would also like to check out.

I am looking forward to checking out these sites more closely to gain a better understanding about how I can learn about and teach visual literacy.

 

 

 

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3 Comments

Filed under LIBE 477

3 responses to “Reading Review: Potential Resources to Support Visual Literacy

  1. Karen, I like how you clearly laid out your search and added the links for each of the sites you are going to check out. Very organized and easy to read blog post. Good job!

  2. Karen,

    A good selection of useful, practical and insightful resources for your own inquiry! You did some decent searching and used different strategies to find and select these sites. Your basic evaluation and commentary offer much to fellow readers of your blog on what they might want to check out. Perhaps the only aspect missing was a Works Cited with the format references to these sites and articles. Overall, good job.

  3. djthind

    Interesting inventory. I appreciated your varied resources. Similarly, I found a combination of a UBC library search and a Google one worked for me; the former for articles and books and the latter for webpages and multimedia. Best –

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